OUR NAME IS CHANGED

We have changed our name from the NEW TRADITION COALITION to DRAW THE LINE LAWRENCE so it better fits our purpose and mission. We call on all community members to come together and DRAW THE LINE on underage drinking and drug use for a healthier and safer place to live.

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Underage drinking crackdown shifts from bars to parties

Law enforcement agencies in Douglas County are shifting their efforts to crack down on underage drinking this spring from bars to neighborhoods and house parties.
Read more:
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2012/may/01/underage-drinking-crackdown-shifts-bars-parties/

KCTV5 investigates license to hide - KCTV 5

Fake ID's are easy to get but may have serious consequences.

KCTV5 investigates license to hide - KCTV 5

Friday, February 3, 2012

OVER THE COUNTER DRUGS STILL A PROBLEM

Prescription Drug Abuse is still a major concern throughout the state of Kansas. A recent incident involving high school students in Northeast Kansas is good reminder that work needs to continue to educate Kansans on the risks involved. To read more about about the incident, click here

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

NEW COALITION NAME as of JANUARY 2012

The New Tradition Coalition is changing its name to New Coalition Name as of January 2012 to:
Draw the Line Lawrence

 We will be changing our web and blog sites to reflect the name change soon. Stay tuned.


Meeting Minutes

December 14, 2011

Welcome and Introductions/agency updates

Peggy Nelson, Diane Ash, Rob Neff, Steve Lewis, Elizabeth Schieb, Phil Bradley, Janelle Martin, Nancy Renfro, and Kelli Flanner were in attendance.

DFC Grant Update- Youth Coalition Reports

MADD Power of Parents had low attendance. There was some discussion of how to reach out to parents with PoP. Ideas included: getting on the agenda for PTA meetings, brown bag lunches at large employers, connecting with athletic directors/coaches, connecting with parents of music group participants.

Youth Coalition activities have been wide ranging in October and November, including many presentations for Red Ribbon week and Students Talking about Tobacco, a successful talent show that engaged over 400 youth and raised money for prevention scholarships, and Great American Smokeout celebrations.

Fake ID 101 Enforcement update

Bar owners will attend the next FAKE ID 101 meeting. Issues that will be discussed include whether to reapply for funds (this is the conclusion of the third funding cycle), sources of IDs that youth are using, and where to go next with this project.

Media/Marketing Update

The first website draft from Kern was presented to the coalition and discussed. We are awaiting a second draft concept and will select one to move forward with. Some website content will need to be provided by coalition members and will be edited for space by the marketing committee. We anticipate this happening in the next couple of months.

Report on the Prescription Drug Take-Back Event-Oct. 29th

There will be another Prescription Drug Take-Back on April 21st. A permanent solution to the problem of what to do with old prescriptions is in the works, but awaiting DEA recommendations for how to proceed.

Parent Surveys

Results of the spring/fall parent surveys were shared with the coalition. All the results show awareness of Those Who Host Lose the Most and other campaigns increasing and acceptability of social hosting decreasing. Numbers of surveys in the fall were more than twice the spring

responses, which is expected as many more parents attend parent/teacher conferences in the fall than spring.

Elections

We need to elect new officers for the coalition. Paid staff is not eligible. There was discussion of a need to bring new people to the table, and Diane Ash and Peggy Nelson agreed to send letters to the parents of their Youth Coalition members inviting them to the January meeting. We hope to get new people to the table in January and hold elections for Chair, Vice Chair, and Secretary in February.

**Next Meeting- January 4th **

PARENT TIPS ON SOCIAL HOSTING IN LAWRENCE

Don’t invite Trouble
into your House ...
Most parents worry whether their teenager is safe at parties. Some parents mistakenly think it’s safer
to allow teens to hold underage drinking parties in their homes. This is called “social hosting” and in Kansas, it’s illegal. If charged and convicted, it’s a
Class A misdemeanor and a $1000 fine. You may be held liable even if you are not home.
Teens can still have fun and be legal.
Take these steps if the party is at your house:
  • Help your teen plan the party.
  • Invite only a certain number of people.
  • Pass out personalized invitations and don’t invite people via e-mail to avoid “open” parties.
  • Put your phone number on the invitation and welcome calls from parents.
  • Make and enforce a rule against any use of alcohol, drugs and tobacco.
  • Call parents if a teen arrives with alcohol or is under the influence.
  • Designate a start and end time for the party.
  • Secure all forms of alcohol, firearms and other dangerous items in your home.
  • Let neighbors know that a parent supervised party has been planned.

When you are out-of-town ...
  • Set a “no party” rule for your house while you are gone.
  • Have a responsible adult stay at your house or ask a neighbor to keep watch.
  • Ask the police to drive by your house.
  • Tell your teen you asked the police to do this.

If your teen attends a party... 
Remind teens that their actions have real consequences.
Know where the party is being held and verify with an adult who will be supervising.
Make sure alcohol will not be served.

Find out how your teen is getting to and from the party.
.
Remind teens to never ride with anyone who’s been drinking or doing drugs.

Tell teens to check in with you first from a land line telephone if they plan to leave the party and go somewhere else.
Assure your teen that they can phone you anytime to be picked up.
Set and enforce a curfew.

A program of
Kansas Family Partnership
5942 SW 29th Street, Topeka, KS 66614
785-266-6161 or 1-800-206-7231
For more information, visit
www.KansasFamily.org.

TEENS, PARENTS & DRIVING

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration just released a report that may influence the way some parents drive.  Read more at the link below.

SAMHSA News Release
Date: 12/6/2011 12:05 AM
Media Contact: SAMHSA Press Office
Telephone: 240-276-2130

New report shows that adolescents are far more likely to drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs if they live with a parent that drives under the influence

http://www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/advisories/1112050724.aspx

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

TEEN DEPRESSION

Troubledteens ThumbnailMany teens who are depressed turn to drugs or alcohol to self medicate and relieve the symptoms.  We as adults need to be aware of the symptoms of depression and know when to get help.  Bert Nash, the Lawrence Community Mental Health Center is a great resource. 


How to Tell if Your Teen is Depressed
Depression can affect people of any age, race, ethnic or economic group. There are two kinds of depressive illness: the sad kind, called major depression, and manic-depression or bipolar disorder, when feeling down and depressed alternates with being hyped-up and sometimes reckless.
You need to have your teen evaluated by a professional if they have several of the following symptoms for more than 2 weeks or if any of these symptoms cause such a big change that your teen can't keep up their usual routine:

         Feels sad or cries a lot and it doesn't go away.
    Feels guilty for no reason; feels like they're no good; lost their confidence.
  • Life seems meaningless or like nothing good is ever going to happen again. They have a negative attitude a lot of the time, or it seems like they have no feelings.
  • Don't feel like doing a lot of the things they used to like music, sports, being with friends, going out and they want to be left alone most of the time.
  • It's hard to make up their mind. They forget lots of things, and it's hard to concentrate.
  • Get irritated often. Little things make them lose their temper and/or over-react.
  • Sleep pattern changes; start sleeping a lot more or have trouble falling asleep at night. Wake up really early most mornings and can't get back to sleep.
  • Eating pattern changes; lost appetite or eat a lot more.
  • Feel restless and tired most of the time.
  • Think about death, or feel like they're dying, or have thoughts about committing suicide.

Manic Symptoms:

          Feel high as a kite...like they're "on top of the world."
    Have unreal ideas about the great things they can do...things that they really can't do.
  • Thoughts go racing through their head and jump from one subject to another and talk a lot.
  • They are a non-stop party, constantly running around.
  • Do too many wild or risky things: with driving, with spending money, with sex, etc.
  • So "up" that they don't need much sleep.
  • Rebellious or irritable and can't get along
Approximately 4 percent of adolescents get seriously depressed each year. Clinical depression is a serious illness that can affect anybody, including teenagers. It can affect thoughts, feelings, behavior, and overall health. Teens with depression can be helped with treatment.

FAKE ID 101 INITIATIVE

Open this University Daily Kansan newspaper article to find out how the FAKE ID 101 initiative worked in  Lawrence this past semester.  Congratulations to our law enforcement community for targeting minors using fake ID's.
http://www.kansan.com/news/2011/dec/06/lawrence-bars-patrolled-underage-drinking/?news

Saturday, December 3, 2011

FREE STATE HIGH YOUTH COALITION

Dear Blog Readers,

I just thought I’d share with you an example of the positive things the New Tradition's youth coalition is doing.  Free State Youth Coalition created and donated a Christmas tree that was in the Festival of Trees.  Their theme was:  "Stay on Track --- Say NO to Drugs".  What a great job and a great message! 

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

ALCOHOL AND THE TEENAGE BRAIN


Here is a quick story from NPR on what the researchers have to say about alcohol use and the teenage brain. 
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=122765890

SURVIVING THE HOLIDAYS WITH A TROUBLED TEEN

The holiday season is often portrayed as a time for happy families to come together but if your family includes a troubled teen the holiday season may be anything but happy.
Here are a few guidelines that may help everyone.

http://parentingteens.about.com/od/parentingtroubledteens/a/Holidays-With-Troubled-Teens.htm?nl=1

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

RED RIBBON WEEK







The Traffic Safety Resource Office announces two competitions.  Pass it on and win!

Seeking Red Ribbon Week Awards Nominations: Did you or your community or school organize any kind of celebration of Red Ribbon Week?  If so, you may have the opportunity to win an award to recognize your achievements! Hurry - the deadline to submit is Friday, November 18, 2011.

To download the nomination form, go here.
Act Out Loud 2012 is Here! From October 14, 2011 - January 13, 2012, teams are invited to enter the contest to participate in three different activities that focus on stronger teen driver safety laws. Teams that complete all three activities will be eligible for the $10,000 grand prize. 
For all contest details, go here.
 

Saturday, October 8, 2011

LAWRENCE HIGH STUDENTS FOR PREVENTION

We have an amazing group of students from Lawrence High.  The New Tradition Youth Coalition called the FYI Club is dedicated to working within their peer group to encourage drug and alcohol free lifestyles.  Please support these students by grabbing the family and attending the Lawrence High Talent Show on November 2nd. 


The 7th Annual LHS FYI Talent show will be in the Lawrence High auditorium on Wednesday, Nov 2, 2011 at 7:00pm!

FYI Youth Coalition sponsors a Talent Show to provide an opportunity for students to participate in a performance event, even if they do not participate in choir, orchestra or band. The proceeds from this show will benefit students in 2 ways:  first, half of the proceeds will help LHS students with financial needs throughout the rest of this year, and second, half of the proceeds will provide a scholarship for students who have worked in prevention. Tickets may be purchased at the door before the event: adults-$4, students K-12-$3 and children ages 4 and under are free. Local businesses support this event by donating dozens of prizes used for the contestants as well as door prizes for the audience. Join us as we celebrate the voices and talents of our local youth!

Diane Ash

Prevention Specialist/Team Leader

Lawrence High School

1901 Louisiana

Lawrence, Kansas 66044

785-832-5050 ext 1449;785-832-5054 fax

Friday, October 7, 2011

HOW TO TALK TO YOUR TEENS ABOUT SMOKING

Denise Whitmer is an author and has a very informative web site for parents.  Here is some help for parents when talking to teens and preteens about smoking.  Read the article below:
http://parentingteens.about.com/bio/Denise-Witmer-403.htm?nl=1

Monday, October 3, 2011

RED RIBBON WEEK OCT 22-30

Red Ribbon week gives parents and teachers a chance to talk about drugs and drug use in our community.  Talking to our youth and listening to what they have to say is a most important step we can take to keep our youth healthy.

From the National DEA:  A little History

Drug Enforcement Administration
Office of Public Affairs
202-307-7977

Red Ribbon Anti-Drug Campaign

Red Ribbon Week is the nation’s oldest and largest drug prevention program in the nation reaching millions of Americans during the last week of October every year. By wearing red ribbons and participating in community anti-drug events, young people pledge to live a drug-free life and pay tribute to DEA Special Agent EnriquĂ© “Kiki” Camarena. Special Agent Kiki Camarena:


  • Special Agent Camarena was an 11-year veteran of the DEA assigned to the Guadalajara, Mexico, office where he was on the trail of the country’s biggest marijuana and cocaine traffickers. In 1985, he was extremely close to unlocking a multi-billion dollar drug pipeline.

  • On February 7, 1985, he was kidnapped, brutally tortured, and murdered by Mexican drug traffickers. His tragic death opened the eyes of many Americans to the dangers of drugs and the international scope of the drug trade. 




  • History of Red Ribbon Week:



  • Shortly after Kiki’s death, Congressman Duncan Hunter and Kiki’s high school friend Henry Lozano launched “Camarena Clubs” in Kiki’s hometown of Calexico, California. Hundreds of club members pledged to lead drug-free lives to honor the sacrifice made by Kiki Camarena.


  • These pledges were delivered to First Lady Nancy Reagan at a national conference of parents combating youth drug use. Several state parent organizations then called on community groups to wear red ribbons during the last week of October as a symbol of their drug-free commitment.


  • The first Red Ribbon Week celebrations were held in La Mirada and Norwalk, California

  • In 1988, the National Family Partnership (NFP) coordinated the first National Red Ribbon Week with President and Mrs. Reagan serving as honorary chairpersons.





  • How to Celebrate Red Ribbon Week:

    The NFP estimates that more than 80 million people participate in Red Ribbon events each year.


  • The campaign is a unified way for communities to take a stand against drugs and show intolerance for illicit drug use and the consequences to all Americans.


  • Schools, businesses, the faith community, media, families, and community coalitions join together to celebrate Red Ribbon Week in many ways, such as: sponsoring essay and poster contests; organizing drug-free races; decorating buildings in red; handing out red ribbons to customers; holding parades or community events; and by publicizing the value of a drug-free, healthy lifestyle.


  • DEA joins with community coalitions and prevention groups to plan and carry out Red Ribbon activities, ranging from classroom events to stadium-sized rallies.



  • Tuesday, September 20, 2011

    CELEBRATE FAMILY DAY

    Celebrate Family Day-A day to eat dinner with your children on September 26, 2011
    The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse  (CASA) created Family Day – A Day to Eat Dinner with Your Children™ in 2001, as a national effort to promote family dinners as an effective way to reduce substance abuse among children and teens. Family Day is celebrated on the fourth Monday in September.  Plan your family dinners as often as you can for a healthy community.  Make it special (and more enticing) by occasionally inviting your child's friend.

    GOT DRUGS? JOIN LAWRENCE TAKE BACK DAY

    Help stop the abuse of perscription drugs.  There is a new trend in Lawrence.  Six of the top ten drugs used by high school seniors were either perscribed or purchased over the counter.  Check your homes for any unused or outdated medications.  Bring to the Law Enforcement Center at 111 E 11th St. (11th and New Hampshire).  Sponsored by the Douglas County Sherrif's Department, Lawrence Police Department and the DEA.  Officers  will be outside collecting and will safely dispose of these potentially harmful medications.  Let's keep these drugs out of the hands of Lawrence youth.

    If you cannot come on October 29th, then follow the Kansas Department of Health and Environment disposal recommendations for pharmaceuticals. Prepare excess medications as follows: crush or dissolve pills in water, coffee, or another liquid. Make a paste of the dissolved pills or liquid medication by adding it to kitty litter or coffee grounds. Put the paste in a closed container, making sure any personal markings are removed. Then put the closed container in the trash.

    Monday, September 19, 2011

    CENTER FOR ADDICTION AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE REPORT

    CASA Columbia Releases 2011 Teen Survey: National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse XVI: Teens  and Parents
    Last week, The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University released the National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse XVI: Teens and Parents.  Click for the summary.

    Friday, September 2, 2011

    LAWRENCE SERVER TRAINING FOR BARS & RESTAURANTS

    On August 28th, at Lawrence Arts Center  representatives from local agencies provided training, including on how to detect fake IDs, for local alcohol servers and retailers. More than 150 staff members from 31 bars and restaurants and three liquor stores attended. Jen Jordan ofDCCCA said organizers were pleased with the turnout, even though they wished more retailers would have attended.

    Tuesday, August 30, 2011

    NEW TRADITION COALITION INITIATIVES

    The New Tradition Coalition is involved im three initiatives to help stop underage drinking in Lawrence.  read the Lawrence Journal World article for more info.
    http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2011/aug/29/local-efforts-will-target-underage-drinking/

    Thursday, August 18, 2011

    Thursday, June 30, 2011

    DON'T BE BLIND TO THE CONSEQUENCES

    Check out this You Tube clip from the Prevention and Recovery Service in Topeka.  Pass it on.

    FAMILY ATTITUDES SET THE STAGE TOWARD ALCOHOL USE IN YOUTH







    Influence of Family Factors and Supervised Alcohol Use on Adolescent Alcohol Use and Harms: Similarities Between Youth in Different Alcohol Policy Contexts

    McMorris, B., Catalano, R., Jung Kim, M., Toumbourou, J., and Hemphill, S. May 2011. Journal of Studies and Alcohol and Drugs, Vol. 72, Pages 418-428.


    Objective of the Study: Harm-minimization policies suggest that alcohol use is a part of normal adolescent development and that parents should supervise their children’s use to encourage responsible drinking. Zero-tolerance policies suggest that all underage alcohol use should be discouraged. This article compared hypotheses derived from harm minimization and zero-tolerance policies regarding the influence of family context and supervised drinking on adolescent alcohol use and related harms among adolescents in Washington State, USA, and Victoria, Australia, two states that have respectively adopted zero-tolerance and harm-minimization policies.

    Method: Representative samples of seventh-grade students (N = 1,945; 989 females) were recruited from schools in each state. Students completed comprehensive questionnaires on alcohol use, related problem behaviors, and risk and protective factors annually from 2002 to 2004 when they were in ninth grade.

    Results: Relationships between family context and alcohol use and harmful use were very similar in both states. Adult-supervised settings for alcohol use were associated with higher levels of harmful alcohol consequences. Adult-supervised alcohol use mediated the links between favorable parental attitudes to alcohol use and ninth-grade alcohol use for students in both states.

    Conclusions: Despite policy differences in the two states, relationships between family context variables and alcohol use and harmful use are remarkably similar. Adult-supervised settings for alcohol use resulted in higher levels of harmful alcohol consequences, contrary to predictions derived from harm-minimization policy. Findings challenge the harm-minimization position that supervised alcohol use or early-age alcohol use will reduce the development of adolescent alcohol problems.

    To learn more about this study, click on http://www.udetc.org/documents/judicial/201106eNews/supervised.pdf or copy and paste this link to your internet browser in order to locate the information.

    CELEBRATE INDEPENDENCE DAY

    The New Tradition Coalition wants to remind you to celebrate your Independence responsibly-

    If you're hosting a party where alcohol is served, make sure to do so responsibly. Some things to keep in mind are:

    • Line-up designated drivers or make sleeping accommodations for your guests who are drinking.
    • Be sure to serve plenty of non-alcoholic drinks.
    • Serve enough substantive food. Consumption of food will help absorb alcohol. 
    • Stop serving alcohol at a set time. This will give guests a chance to sober up. 
    • If your guests are intoxicated -- take away the keys. If you let someone leave your home after they've had too much to drink, you could be held responsible if they hurt themselves or someone else.
    • Don't serve to minors. It's illegal, dangerous and irresponsible.   

    If you're doing some traveling, here are a few tips:

    • Whenever you plan on using alcohol, designate a sober driver before going out and give that person the keys.
    • If you're impaired, call a taxi, use mass transit or call a sober friend or family member to get you home safely.
    • Promptly report drunk drivers you see on the roadways to law enforcement. 
    • Wearing your safety belt or if you're riding a motorcycle, make sure to wear a helmet and other protective gear.
    • While traveling to and from celebrations on your motorcycle, remember to make yourself visible and ride your motorcycle where you can be seen to avoid a crash. 
    • If you know someone who is about to drive or ride while impaired, take their keys and help them make other arrangements to get to where they are going safely.


    Monday, June 27, 2011

    ADVICE ABOUT PARENT TROUBLED TEENS

    Parents of troubled teens need expert advice and support. Read the information below to help you stay on the right track. And keep in mind - troubled teens do get better.
    http://parentingteens.about.com/od/parentingtroubledteens/a/6-Tips-For-Parenting-Troubled-Teens.htm?nl=1

    Tuesday, May 10, 2011

    STICKER SHOCK

    Dozens of area high school students visited local liquor stores last Saturday morning, but they weren’t trying to buy liquor. They had a message for of-age consumers: Don’t buy alcohol for them. Visit these articles about the New Tradition Youth Coalition and see their efforts to curb the practice of buying alcohol for minors.

    http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2011/apr/14/high-schoolers-hope-sticker-shock-discourages-prov/
    http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2011/apr/16/high-school-students-take-stand-against-underage-d/

    Wednesday, April 27, 2011

    RESEARCH ON BULLYING


    Research Note
    Bullying Linked to Violence at Home
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently published the results of a study that suggests bullying may be associated with family violence.
    To assess the association between family violence and other risk factors and being involved in or affected by bul¬lying, the CDC and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health analyzed data from the 2009 Massachusetts Youth Health Survey, an anonymous paper and pencil survey conducted every two years. The study included 2,859 middle school students and 2,948 high school students. Overall response rates were 55.8 percent and 66.7 percent for middle and high school students, respectively. The participants were categorized based on their responses to two survey items related to bullying. The following are the four student categories along with the percentage of surveyed students who fell in each category:
    • Victims of bullying: 26.8 percent of middle school and 15.6 percent of high school students
    • Bullies: 7.5 percent of middle school and 8.4 percent of high school students
    • Bully-victims (those who had been victims of bullying and had bullied others): 9.6 percent of middle school and 6.5 percent of high school students
    • Neither (those who had neither bullied others nor were victims of bullying): 50.6 percent of middle school and 69.5 percent of high school students

    The study found that bullies, victims, and bully-victims were significantly more likely to be physically hurt by a family member or to have witnessed violence at home than students who were not involved in bullying. After adjusting for potential differences by age, group, sex, and race and ethnicity, researchers created the following adjusted odds ratios (AORs)—or likelihood of involvement in bullying:
    • For middle school students being physically hurt by a member of the family: 2.9 for victims (that is, the odds of being a victim are 2.9 times higher than for someone who was not being physically hurt by a member of the family), 4.4 for bullies, and 5 for bully-victims
    • For middle school students witnessing family violence, 2.6 for victims, 2.9 for bullies, and 3.9 for bully-victims
    • For high school students being physically hurt by a family member: 2.8 for victims, 3.8 for bullies, and 5.4 for bully-victims
    • For high school students witnessing family violence: 2.3 for victims, 2.7 for bullies, and 6.8 for bully-victims

    The researchers also examined risk factors that have been well documented in previous studies. They found significantly elevated AORs for victims, bullies, and bully-victims for the majority of these risk factors. The following are some results (AORs) for middle school students:

    • Seriously considering suicide: 3.0 for victims, 4.1 for bullies, and 6.6 for bully-victims
    • Intentionally injuring themselves, 2.3 for victims, 3.1 for bullies, and 7.4 for bully-victims
    • Feeling sad or hopeless, 2.3 for victims, 2.1 for bullies, and 4.2 bully-victims

    Similar patterns were observed among high school students. This report presents the first state-specific data on a broad range of risk factors suspected to be associated with bullying for middle and high school students. The researchers note that these results “underscore the importance of primary bullying prevention programs and of comprehensive programs and strategies that involve families.”

    This study was published in the April 22, 2011, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

    Tuesday, April 19, 2011

    6 Tips to Create a Safe Prom and High-School Graduation Season for Your Teen

    There’s something about prom and graduation season that makes rational parents go bonkers. Here are 6 tips for parents to help keep their teen safe and make this season one to remember for all the right reasons.

    http://decoder.drugfree.org/2011/04/08/5-tips-to-create-a-safe-prom-and-high-school-graduation-season-for-your-teen/

    PROM NIGHT DRAMA


    A healthy discussion with your teenager may make prom night a little easier. Here are some articles on prom and alcohol, drugs, sex and more that may make those talks more comfortable and prom a little safer.

    http://decoder.drugfree.org/category/education/high-school/prom/
    http://decoder.drugfree.org/2010/04/29/for-a-safe-prom-night-parents-please-don%E2%80%99t-serve-alcohol-to-teens/

    Thursday, April 7, 2011

    ARE TEENS GETTING ALCOHOL FROM MY HOME?


    A new study of young teens revealed some surprising facts about their drinking habits, specifically where they get their booze. An estimated 700,000 U.S. kids in the 12 to 14 year old age group (which is about 5.9 percent) had consumed alcohol in the past month, and of those, nearly half got it for free from their family or at home. The study, conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) as part of the National Survey on Drug Abuse and Health, shows that family members can play a big role in reducing kids' access to alcohol and preventing underage drinking. "People who begin drinking alcohol before the age of 15 are six times more likely than those who start at age 21 and older to develop alcohol problems, " SAMSHA administrator Pamela Hyde told MHND. If you're one to have an occasional post-work cocktail or wine with dinner, you are likely have spirits in your house. But do you keep it under lock and key? Should you? Post Below. To read more about the study go to: http://www.drugfree.org/join-together/addiction/over-700000-young-teens-2

    DESIGNER DRUGS

    Ever heard of "fake marijuana" or "legal speed"? These are the new designer drugs and kids don't really know what they are taking. To find out more, read the Project Alert newsletter. http://www.projectalert.com/newsletters/spring-2011/designer-drugs-fashion-goes-synthetic

    Wednesday, April 6, 2011

    Here's a great book for teens written by a teen. Chandler Dewitt writes about choices youth make from junior high through young adulthood. It is a great book for teens who are transitioning from grade school, junior high and even high school seniors- a graduation gift that keeps on giving! Visit this link for details. http://www.connectwithkids.com/insideout/index.shtml

    Wednesday, March 16, 2011

    BUYERS BEWARE-SEE WHAT KIDS SAY


    Watch this video and what teens and experts say about their experience when parents allow drinking in their homes. It is easy to allow underage drinking in your home and very difficult to control and monitor it the risky behavior that may follow. Should parents confer or ask if it is OK with other parents before letting their teen drink in their home? How are the teen drinking parties being monitored? Would you trust that your teen is safe? It is against the law. Is it worth it?
    http://www.youtube.com/connectwithkids#p/u/2/xVemAO52BEk

    Monday, March 14, 2011

    LETTER TO PARENTS


    Newsletter: April 2011

    Teens, Parties, and Alcohol Don’t Mix

    Many well-meaning parents think that it is enough to take away car keys at their teen’s parties so the teens can’t drink and drive. Parents provide the alcohol or allow alcohol to be consumed based on the false belief that it’s a rite of passage, especially at prom and graduation parties.

    Parents often cite these two misguided reasons, safety and rite of passage, for hosting teen parties where alcohol is served. They believe it is “safer” for kids to drink at home, and may even think that hosting teen parties makes them appear to be a “cool” parent. When parents serve alcohol to teens in their home, in reality what they are doing is facilitating their kids’ comfort with alcohol. This practice sends a mixed message. Teens believe, “If it’s OK to drink at home, it’s OK to drink.” The reality is that the consequences can be overwhelming and in extreme cases fatal.

    Parents planning to host parties for their teens should think twice before serving alcohol. Hosting a party for teenagers with alcohol can be costly. It is illegal, unsafe, and unhealthy for anyone under the age of 21 to drink alcohol.

    Here are the laws in Lawrence:
    • You cannot host minors consuming alcoholic liquor or cereal malt beverages at your residence, land, building or rented room (ex: hotel).

    • As an adult, it is unlawful to directly or indirectly sell to, buy for, give or furnish any alcoholic liquor or beer to anyone under the age of 21.

    • Furnishing/purchasing alcohol can result in a minimum fine of $200 and a sentence of up to 6 months in jail and up to $1,000 in fines plus, court and legal fees.

    • Hosting a party carries a minimum fine of $1,000 or up to $2,500 with up to a year in county jail, plus court and legal fees.

    We hope you will partner with the New Tradition Coalition and the City of Lawrence as we launch the “Parents Who Host, Lose The Most” public awareness campaign to help parents think about the dangers of teenage drinking parties. The campaign stresses to parents that hosting teen drinking parties should not be regarded as a “rite of passage” but as a health and safety problem with legal ramifications. Don’t be a party to teenage drinking. Refuse to supply alcohol to children in your home or on your property; be at home when your teenager has a party; make sure your teenager’s friends do not bring alcohol into your home (even if that means checking backpacks and purses); talk to other parents about providing alcohol-free beverages at youth events; provide teenagers with opportunities for alcohol-free events and activities, and report underage drinking. Call 1-866-MUST-BE-21, or your local police to report violations. Together, we can make the difference.

    Friday, March 11, 2011

    SPRING BREAK TIPS FOR TEENS AND PARENTS

    Spring break is right around the corner. Here are some tips for parents and teens taking a trip. Feel free to print these pages and take to the dinner table. It is just another excuse to talk to teens! You'll be glad you did and they will have the tools to stay safe.

    Many news outlets have picked up our story about the Fake ID 101 project in Lawrence, Kansas. It is an itiative that strives to create a community wide change in attitudes about underage drinking and using fake ID's to get alcohol. It is against the law and Lawrence is serious about it.
    Pick a source and read more:

    http://www.kansan.com/news/2011/mar/10/coalition-targets-fake-ids-among-students/?news
    www.eldoradotimes.com/.../Lawrence-coalition-still-working-to-fight-fake- IDs
    www.kansas.com/2011/03/.../group-turns-to-facebook-to-fight.html
    www.allfacebook.com/facebook-ad-targets-teenagers-looking-for-fake-ids
    blogs.pitch.com/.../ku_mclovins_beware_fake_id_crackdown_underway_in_ lawrence.php
    www.fox4kc.com/.../wdaf-fake-id-crackdown-in-lawrence-20110307,0, 4533506.story
    www.wibw.com/.../Group_Turns_To_Facebook_To_Fight_Fake_IDs_ 117516918.html

    Monday, February 28, 2011

    FAKE ID 101 CAMPAIGN


    February 26, 2011 Excerpt from Lawrence Journal World article
    No Faking: Lawrence police cracking down on bogus IDs
    Archive for Saturday, February 26, 2011
    Coalition uses KDOT grant to fight underage drinking

    The Facebook ad targeted Lawrence area youths who might be looking for a fake ID.
    Apparently, the power of advertising works.

    A total of 5,247 people between the ages of 16 and 20 clicked on the ad that featured a fake ID using the character “McLovin’” from the movie “Superbad” during a 60-day period last semester.

    But instead of getting a chance to obtain a fake ID that could be used to try to buy booze at Lawrence liquor stores and bars, people who clicked on the ad were directed to a website: the New Tradition Coalition of Lawrence, which combats alcohol abuse and underage drinking.

    Coalition members said interest in the Facebook ad clearly illustrates the demand for fake IDs and the prevalence of underage drinking in Lawrence, particularly among Kansas University students.

    “That bothered me because that many kids actually clicked on it because they were thinking they were going to get a fake ID,” said Jen Jordan, director of prevention for DCCCA. “We know that underage drinking is an issue in Lawrence and at KU and other colleges. We’re just trying to address it.”

    Among the efforts is a project dubbed Fake ID 101.
    See more at:
    http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2011/feb/26/no-faking-lawrence-police-cracking-down-bogus-ids/

    Saturday, January 29, 2011

    MYTHS ABOUT KIDS & DRINKING


    Young people drink to have a good time.
    A RECENT NATIONAL SURVEY OF JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TELLS A MUCH DIFFERENT STORY. MORE THAN 30% OF TEENAGERS DRINK ALONE; BOREDOM AND EMOTIONAL DISTRESS ARE AMONG THE REASONS WHY THEY SAY THEY DRINK.

    Alcohol is less dangerous than other drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, or LSD.
    CAR CRASHES, SUICIDES. HOMICIDES AND DROWNING ARE ALL ASSOCIATED WITH ALCOHOL USE AND MAKE IT THE NUMBER–ONE DRUG PROBLEM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. IN FACT, THE MOST LIKELY CAUSE OF DEATH FOR A 16-YEAR OLD IS ALCOHOL-RELATED.

    If I let my child drink at home, he or she will be less likely to get into trouble with alcohol outside the home.
    RESEARCH SHOWS TEENAGERS WHOSE PARENTS ALLOW THEM TO DRINK AT HOME ARE MORE LIKELY TO DRINK OUTSIDE THE HOME AND TO USE OTHER DRUGS. THEY ALSO HAVE A MUCH GREATER CHANCE OF DEVELOPING A SERIOUS PROBLEM.


    So long as my child doesn’t drive, it’s okay for him or her to drink.
    TEENS DON’T DRINK THE SAME WAY ADULTS DO. MANY TEENS ENGAGE IN “BINGE DRINKING” AND DOWN THEIR DRINKS QUICKLY SO THAT THEY WILL GET DRUNK. WHEN THEY ARE DRUNK THEY ARE MORE LIKELY TO DRINK AND DRIVE, OR TO RIDE WITH ANOTHER TEEN WHO HAS BEEN DRINKING.

    A FEW UNDERAGE DRINKING FACTS


    Every day, 5,400 young people under 16 have their first drink of alcohol. (Source: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth with calculations from Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health)


    Studies reveal that alcohol consumption by adolescents results in brain damage - possibly permanent -and impairs intellectual development. (Source: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research (Volume 24, Number 2 National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism)


    Adolescents drink less and have fewer alcohol-related problems when their parents discipline them consistently and set clear expectations. (Source: Hawkins JD, Graham JW, Maguin E, et al. 1997 Exploring the effects of age of alcohol use initiation and psychosocial risk factors on subsequent alcohol misuse. Journal of Studies on Alcohol. 58(3): 280-290)

    When drinking is delayed until age 21, a child’s risk of serious alcohol problems is decreased by 70 percent. (Source: Calculated from information contained in: Grant BF, Dawson DA. 1997, Age at onset of alcohol use and its association with DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence. Results from the National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey. Journal of Substance Abuse 9:103-110.)

    Wednesday, January 19, 2011

    NEW TEXTING & DRIVING LAW


    May 24th, 2010 - Kansas Texting Bill Signed into Law
    Kansas Senate Bill 300 has been signed into law by Governor Parkinson.

    The new law prohibits drivers from writing, sending, or reading a text message while driving.

    The ban on text messaging went into effect on January 1st, 2011.

    The minimum fine is $60 plus court costs and the maximum fine is $150. The consequences of texting while driving are even higher! Share this new law with people you know.